Category Archives: Editorial

The Troubled Beginnings of the Pentium

EDITORIAL

Back in 1993, Intel released the successor to the i486, the Pentium. Originally to be called the i586, Intel was facing the problem of rivals using the same naming scheme as them and were unsuccessful in trademarking 586 due to it being a string of numbers. To combat this, Intel approached Legicon Branding, a branding firm behind the likes of Apple’s PowerBook and Adobe’s InDesign, who came up with the name Pentium. Penta being five (with the Pentium being the fifth iteration of x86 CPU), and -ium being the suffix found with many elements on the periodic table. With Intel deeming the processor to be a key element in a PC, the Pentium brand was born.

Cancelled 3dfx Interactive Rampage GPU in the Wild, Put Through its Paces with Max Payne, Unreal Tournament & 3DMark 2001

EDITORIAL

3dfx Interactive is a name that will forever go down in the history books for the advances they brought to 3D gaming. If you’re unfamiliar with the legacy of 3dfx, have a look at this Technology Explained article we did a while ago. In some of the most exciting retro news in a long time, Martín Gamero Prieto has shown images of a working sample of the unreleased Rampage which he put through its paces in several games and 3DMark.

Real Time Ray Tracing in Quake 2 in 2017, or How Far We’ve Actually Come in a Year

EDITORIAL

NVIDIA’s real time ray tracing hype has been taking a beating for its low performance when compared to traditional render methods – namely rasterization, which is what is used in current games. To fully appreciate just how amazing the technology really is, let’s take a look at real time ray tracing from last year. The game is 20 years old and the card was the prime of its time – Quake 2 on a Titan Xp.

The Changing Definition of the Enthusiast

EDITORIAL

I fully understand the irony of this editorial as I sit here and type this from a Corsair K95 Platinum RGB keyboard, but I can’t help but come to the realisation: We deserve nothing more than RGB these days. To be honest, though, I didn’t get this keyboard for its lighting effects but rather for its comfort when typing. There was a time not too long ago (OK, it was a good while back – more than a decade for sure) where engineering was appreciated no matter the appearance, while today we have the exact opposite scenario.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX Failure Rates

EDITORIAL

The GeForce RTX range of cards have been taking a lot of flack since launch, mainly from people disappointed with the performance and lack of support for RTX in games, but also partly for reportedly high failure rates with users on the NVIDIA forums and Reddit reporting either black screens or artifacting.